Advertize Your Event/Service Here

Your Maryland County Organization

 

 

Actions By The Maryland State Legislature (Facts Surrounding The Founding Of Maryland In Africa

In December 1831, the Maryland state legislature appropriated an annual US$10,000 for 26 years to transport free blacks and ex-slaves from the United States to Africa. The act appropriated funds of up to $20,000 a year, up to a total of $260,000, in order to commence the process of African colonization, a considerable expenditure by the standards of the time.The legislature empowered the Maryland State Colonization Society to carry out the ends it had in view. Most of the money would be spent on the colony itself, to make it attractive to settlers. Free passage was offered, plus rent, 5 acres (20,000 m2) of land to farm, and low interest loans which would eventually be forgiven if the settlers chose to remain in Liberia. The remainder was spent on agents paid to publicize the new colony.

At the same time, measures were enacted to force freed slaves to leave the state, unless a court of law found them to be of such "extraordinary good conduct and character" that they might be permitted to remain. Any slave manumitted by his master must be reported to the authorities, and county clerks who did not do so could be fined. It was in order to carry out this legislative purpose that the Maryland State Colonization Society was established.

In 1832 the legislature placed new restrictions on the liberty of free blacks, in order to encourage emigration. They were not permitted to vote, serve on juries, or hold public office. Unemployed ex-slaves without visible means of support could be re-enslaved at the discretion of local sheriffs. By this means the supporters of colonization hoped to encourage free blacks to leave the state.

John Latrobe, for two decades the president of the MSCS, and later president of the ACS, proclaimed that settlers would be motivated by the "desire to better one's condition", and that sooner or later "every free person of color" would be persuaded to leave Maryland

John Brown Russwurm

In 1836 the colony appointed its first black governor John Brown Russwurm (1799–1851), who remained governor until his death. Russworm encouraged the immigration of African-Americans to Maryland-in-Africa and supported agriculture and trade.[16] He had begun his career as the colonial secretary for the American Colonization Society between 1830 and 1834. He also worked as the editor of the Liberia Herald, though he resigned his post in 1835 to protest America's colonization policies.

In 1838, a number of other African-American settlements on the west coast of Africa were united into the Commonwealth of Liberia, which then declared its independence in 1847. However, the colony of Maryland in Liberia colony remained independent, as the Maryland State Colonization Society wished to maintain its trade monopoly in the area. On February 2, 1841, Maryland-in-Africa was granted statehood, and became the State of Maryland. In 1847 the Maryland State Colonization Society, published the Constitution and Laws of Maryland in Liberia, based on the United States Constitution.

Declaration of Independence and annexation by Liberia:  Flag of the Republic of Maryland

On May 29, 1854, The State of Maryland declared its independence, naming itself the Republic of Maryland, or Maryland in Liberia, with its capital at Harper. It held the land along the coast between the Grand Cess and San Pedro Rivers. However, the new republic would survive just three years as an independent state.

Soon afterward, local tribes including the Grebo and the Kru attacked the State of Maryland. Unable to maintain its own defense, Maryland appealed to Liberia, its more powerful neighbor, for help. President Roberts sent military assistance, and an alliance of Marylanders and Liberian militia troops successfully repelled the local tribesmen. However, it was now clear that the Republic of Maryland could not survive as an independent state, and on March 18, 1857 Maryland was annexed by Liberia, becoming known henceforth as Maryland County.

Referendum To Declare Independence

The Maryland State Colonization Society was established in Maryland in the United States in 1830. The group established the Maryland Colony in Africa on 22 February 1834.[2] After Liberia declared independence in 1847, the desire for independence also grew in Maryland, and the settlers presented a petition to the authorities for a referendum.

An independence referendum was held in the Maryland Colony on 31 January 1853. Only 122 people voted in the referendum, all in favor of independence, with 0 against.

In February 1854 elections for a Constitutional Council were held. The Council subsequently produced a constitution making the territory a presidential republic with a bicameral legislature.  The House of Representatives would have five members serving two year terms and the Senate four members serving four year terms.[1] The presidential term would be two years.[1] Elections would be held under universal suffrage for "colored" men, and only Maryland citizens would be able to own property.

Governors For The Independent State of Maryland

Term

Incumbent

Notes

February 12, 1834

Maryland State Colonization Society founds Maryland-in-Africa colony

February 12, 1834 to February 1836

James Hall, Governor

February 1836 to July 1, 1836

Oliver Holmes, Jr., Governor

July 1, 1836 to September 28, 1836

Three-Man Committee

September 28, 1836 to February 2, 1841

John Brown Russwurm, Governor

State of Maryland in Liberia

February 2, 1841 to June 9, 1851

John Brown Russwurm, Governor

June 9, 1851 to 1852

Samuel Ford McGill, acting Governor

1852 to May 29, 1854

Samuel Ford McGill, Governor

The Independent State of Maryland in Liberia

8,1854

Samuel Ford McGill, Governor

June 8, 1854 to April 1856

William A. Prout, Governor

April 1856 to March 18, 1857

Boston Jenkins Drayton, Governor

March 18, 1857

 

 

 

Founding of The Republic Maryland In Africa

John B Russurm: First Black Governor Of Maryland In Africa

In December 1831, the Maryland state legislature appropriated an annual US$10,000 for 26 years to transport free blacks and ex-slaves from the United States to Africa. The act appropriated funds of up to $20,000 a year, up to a total of $260,000, in order to commence the process of African colonization, a considerable expenditure by the standards of the time. The legislature empowered the Maryland State Colonization Society to carry out the ends it had in view. read more

The Grebo Tribe Of Liberia

Current Population: 387,000 (2001 est)

Grebo people (or Glebo) is a term used to refer to an ethnic group or subgroup within the larger Kru group of West Africa, a language and cultural ethnicity, and to certain of its constituent elements. Within Liberia members of this group are found primarily in Maryland County and Grand Kru County in the southeastern portion of the country, but also in River Gee County and Sinoe County. read More

Maryland County Development Agenda

Maryland County shall be a secured, peaceful, socially, economically and infrastructurally viable County with a system of good governance, justice
and equal opportunities for all. read more

Call 240-654-4937